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Inception
2010
Inception.Cam.XviD-FLAWL3SS.srt
Inception.Extras.Jump.Right.into.the.Action.Grym.srt
Inception ac3 iTa-Mp3 by BioOne.eng.srt
Inception.2010.trailer3.srt
Subtitles
Subtitle content
Inception.Extras.Jump.Right.into.the.Action.Grym.srt
00:00:01.835 – 00:00:07.933
A man possessed of some radical notions.
00:00:15.682 – 00:00:18.777
NOLAN: Inception is a project that I first started working on...
00:00:18.935 – 00:00:20.061
...about 10 years ago.
00:00:20.228 – 00:00:26.281
I became very interested in the idea of doing a film about dreams...
00:00:26.443 – 00:00:30.619
...about the relationship of our waking life to our dreaming life.
00:00:31.656 – 00:00:34.375
The idea that has always fascinated me about dreams...
00:00:34.534 – 00:00:37.788
...is everything within that dream is created by your own mind...
00:00:37.954 – 00:00:40.082
...as you experience it.
00:00:40.248 – 00:00:44.549
For a filmmaker, it's an ideal world to be dealing with.
00:00:47.047 – 00:00:49.721
THOMAS: The script itself wasn't like he wrote it eight years ago...
00:00:49.883 – 00:00:52.602
...and then it just sat in a drawer untouched.
00:00:55.43 – 00:00:57.524
Every couple of years, at the end of every movie...
00:00:57.682 – 00:01:01.312
...he would go back to it, tweak a bit and think a bit more.
00:01:03.313 – 00:01:06.157
NOLAN: Over the years, I tried to write different versions of this.
00:01:06.316 – 00:01:08.535
I tried to write it as a smaller film.
00:01:08.693 – 00:01:11.867
And what I constantly found was that as soon as you're entering...
00:01:12.03 – 00:01:16.285
...into the idea of what can the human mind conceive of, what world could it create...
00:01:17.744 – 00:01:19.963
...you wanna see this on a grand scale.
00:01:22.04 – 00:01:25.761
The material demanded this very large-scale approach.
00:01:29.047 – 00:01:31.015
Inception, certainly, takes a lot of leaps...
00:01:31.174 – 00:01:33.643
...in terms of the universal experience of dreaming.
00:01:33.802 – 00:01:37.056
I wrote the script very much from my own experiences of dreaming...
00:01:37.222 – 00:01:39.691
...and sort of extrapolating those.
00:01:40.6 – 00:01:44.4
But there are certain things that we take to be common enough...
00:01:44.562 – 00:01:48.066
...that people will be able to relate, the idea that you can't die in a dream.
00:01:48.233 – 00:01:51.032
When you die in a dream, effectively you wake up.
00:01:51.486 – 00:01:55.116
Things like the kick, the feeling of falling snapping you awake.
00:01:55.281 – 00:01:56.624
That seemed a very common thing.
00:01:56.783 – 00:02:00.253
In talking to people, it seemed something that people really recognized.
00:02:00.537 – 00:02:04.667
And it felt important to try and incorporate any of the really familiar touchstones...
00:02:04.833 – 00:02:06.426
...of what it is to dream.
00:02:07.127 – 00:02:10.176
Any of the things that are universal that could allow the audience...
00:02:10.338 – 00:02:12.306
...to relate their own experience of dreaming...
00:02:12.465 – 00:02:16.811
...t this rather, you know, fantastical set of events.
00:02:17.595 – 00:02:21.27
Chris often talked about this Escher-like architecture world...
00:02:21.432 – 00:02:23.355
...where things are built on top of each other...
00:02:23.518 – 00:02:26.863
...and layers and this endless stream of creation.
00:02:27.856 – 00:02:28.948
So in that respect...
00:02:29.107 – 00:02:31.86
...from a character standpoint in working with him, let's just say:
00:02:32.026 – 00:02:35.03
"Look, if all these dream states are real to him...
00:02:35.196 – 00:02:37.449
...we have to treat them emotionally that way."
00:02:37.615 – 00:02:41.29
In other words, everything needs to be emotionally charged.
00:02:41.744 – 00:02:45.123
NOLAN: There are similarities of what the film making process is...
00:02:45.29 – 00:02:49.466
...and what the characters and the team of characters is doing in the film itself.
00:02:50.295 – 00:02:53.39
They're creators, they're people who create an entire world...
00:02:53.548 – 00:02:55.971
...fr somebody else to exist in.
00:02:57.594 – 00:03:00.894
And Inception is intended to be a film that tries to explore...
00:03:01.055 – 00:03:03.478
...the exciting possibilities of the human mind...
00:03:03.641 – 00:03:06.315
...and the infinite potential of the human mind.
00:03:21.201 – 00:03:24.25
COBB: What is the most resilient parasite?
00:03:24.412 – 00:03:28.337
A bacteria? A virus?
00:03:28.499 – 00:03:29.716
An intestinal worm?
00:03:29.876 – 00:03:31.093
ARTHUR: Uh...
00:03:31.252 – 00:03:33.095
What Mr. Cobb is trying to say--
00:03:33.254 – 00:03:34.471
An idea.
00:03:35.59 – 00:03:38.139
Resilient. Highly contagious.
00:03:38.301 – 00:03:42.397
Once an idea has taken hold of the brain, it's almost impossible to eradicate.
00:03:50.98 – 00:03:53.733
DAYS: Japanese architecture has such a unique look to it...
00:03:53.9 – 00:03:56.323
...and such a wonderful use of color.
00:03:56.486 – 00:03:59.41
So for me, it was about creating a castle...
00:03:59.572 – 00:04:03.327
...that was sort of somewhere between the 15th and 16th century...
00:04:03.493 – 00:04:07.088
...that had then been inhabited by a modern man.
00:04:07.247 – 00:04:10.501
And I had found some examples in Japan...
00:04:10.667 – 00:04:15.673
...of traditional Japanese architecture that had been re-created as brand new...
00:04:15.839 – 00:04:18.763
...with all the varnish in place, with modern lighting.
00:04:18.925 – 00:04:21.678
Chris saw that and thought, "Oh, this is just weird. It's strange.
00:04:21.845 – 00:04:24.394
I really like it." And that's where we started.
00:04:24.556 – 00:04:26.433
The castle set was interesting...
00:04:26.599 – 00:04:30.57
...because part of the dream becomes this earthquake, $0...
00:04:30.728 – 00:04:33.197
You know, normally, if you were doing an earthquake set...
00:04:33.356 – 00:04:35.859
...you'd build it onto some sort of rig...
00:04:36.025 – 00:04:38.653
...that will shake it so you'll get all those movements.
00:04:38.82 – 00:04:42.165
You know, because of the size of this set, it wasn't feasible to do that.
00:04:42.323 – 00:04:45.577
Wally Stepsister, he's a tremendous creative ally...
00:04:45.743 – 00:04:47.882
...in terms of how the story is gonna unfold visually.
00:04:48.037 – 00:04:50.916
We looked at a lot of different earthquake devices...
00:04:51.082 – 00:04:53.631
...camera devices for shaking the camera.
00:04:53.793 – 00:04:56.387
But really, testing them, they all look a little mechanical...
00:04:56.546 – 00:05:00.722
...and so all of the shaking and shuddering effects for the earthquake...
00:05:00.884 – 00:05:03.387
...are done in old-fashioned way, just by shaking the camera.
00:05:03.553 – 00:05:06.181
We combined that with a lot of Chris Corbould...
00:05:06.347 – 00:05:11.148
...our special effects supervisor, his expertise in destruction.
00:05:11.311 – 00:05:13.359
CORBOULD: We always had to keep in our minds...
00:05:13.521 – 00:05:16.274
...there was an earthquake going on, so throughout...
00:05:16.441 – 00:05:21.038
...we were pulling over statues, pulling over vases, bits of dressing.
00:05:21.195 – 00:05:24.62
We were able to get up above and put big drop boxes, which--
00:05:24.782 – 00:05:27.376
And when we push the button, it would open up some trapdoors...
00:05:27.535 – 00:05:29.208
...and add lots of lightweight debris.
00:05:29.37 – 00:05:32.294
We pretested everything so we knew it was safe for Leo.
00:05:32.457 – 00:05:35.176
We had him running through soft debris, you know, dropping on him...
00:05:35.335 – 00:05:38.088
...and beams are dropping beside him, and glass blowing behind him.
00:05:38.254 – 00:05:40.177
And because Leo is very focused...
00:05:40.34 – 00:05:43.719
...you'd know when you said you need to be here, he is there in that position.
00:05:43.885 – 00:05:46.604
From A to B, he does exactly what you choreograph.
00:05:46.763 – 00:05:50.142
Which makes it very easy to put the effects around him.
00:05:50.308 – 00:05:53.278
NOLAN: The flood in the Japanese castle really challenged Chris Corbould...
00:05:53.436 – 00:05:56.155
...t put this on film for real...
00:05:56.314 – 00:05:59.443
...in a massive way so that we could really put the performers...
00:05:59.609 – 00:06:02.658
...in the middle of an extremely powerful event.
00:06:02.82 – 00:06:03.992
Chris had had a plan...
00:06:04.155 – 00:06:07.455
...t have this big metal shipping containers full of water...
00:06:07.617 – 00:06:10.211
...the traditional dump-tank method of doing this kind of scene.
00:06:11.079 – 00:06:14.208
But it became apparent as we looked at the way the stunt would work...
00:06:14.374 – 00:06:18.129
...we wouldn't-- Certainly, wouldn't be able the actors anywhere near it, let alone--
00:06:18.294 – 00:06:19.546
Really even a stunt performer.
00:06:19.712 – 00:06:22.215
What Chris and his guys came up with for this film...
00:06:22.382 – 00:06:25.807
...was this extremely clever method of using air cannons.
00:06:26.177 – 00:06:28.145
CORBOULD: Flooding was achieved...
00:06:28.304 – 00:06:32.434
...by two underground pressurized containers, which we hit sequentially.
00:06:32.6 – 00:06:35.194
And because they were coming from about 20-foot up high...
00:06:35.353 – 00:06:36.605
...through windows...
00:06:36.771 – 00:06:39.524
...it sort of created this big wave coming towards the camera.
00:06:39.691 – 00:06:43.321
You start dealing with, you know, 200 gallons of water is a lot of weight...
00:06:43.486 – 00:06:46.66
...so we were pressurizing it to 150 pounds per square inch...
00:06:46.823 – 00:06:49.326
...more high-pressure water coming into the room.
00:06:49.492 – 00:06:51.665
We wanted more of an atomized look...
00:06:51.828 – 00:06:56.004
...rather than the traditional big dump of water, as it were.
00:06:56.165 – 00:06:58.429
It's those shots you have to get right first time.
00:06:58.584 – 00:07:00.757
A lot of setup. If you don't get it right first time...
00:07:00.92 – 00:07:02.718
...then you're into a big redress, you know...
00:07:02.88 – 00:07:06.225
...because you've got three, four thousand gallons of water now in the set.
00:07:17.311 – 00:07:18.483
[GRUNTS]
00:07:24.944 – 00:07:26.161
[HISSING]
00:07:27.405 – 00:07:28.827
[SAITO GROANS]
00:07:29.032 – 00:07:30.409
This isn't gonna work. Wake him up.
00:07:43.796 – 00:07:45.059
[GRUNTS]
00:07:56.058 – 00:07:58.857
NOLAN: The sequence in the film when Paris disintegrates...
00:07:59.019 – 00:08:05.777
...the cafe disintegrates around Ariadne, was our attempt to really portray...
00:08:05.943 – 00:08:10.449
...the danger of the world destabilizing, the dream world collapsing...
00:08:10.614 – 00:08:15.04
...when the dreamer becomes aware of the fact that they're dreaming.
00:08:15.202 – 00:08:19.207
The cafe explosion sequence was actually challenging in two aspects.
00:08:19.373 – 00:08:23.844
One aspect was Chris wanted this whole explosion sequence...
00:08:24.002 – 00:08:25.845
...t take place in the middle of Paris.
00:08:26.004 – 00:08:29.008
And the Parisians are not too friendly toward explosions...
00:08:29.174 – 00:08:30.426
...in the middle of Paris...
00:08:30.592 – 00:08:34.563
...so when we started talking to them about what we were gonna do...
00:08:34.721 – 00:08:38.021
...the faces were pretty grim. So that was the first issue.
00:08:38.183 – 00:08:40.06
The second issue was that Chris really wanted...
00:08:40.227 – 00:08:42.855
...to get Leonardo and Ellen in the shot.
00:08:43.021 – 00:08:44.944
THOMAS: Chris Corbould came up with this way...
00:08:45.107 – 00:08:48.156
...of creating an explosion using air cannons.
00:08:48.318 – 00:08:53.165
We did tests with people sitting in front, and we showed them to Leo and to Ellen...
00:08:53.323 – 00:08:55.325
...and said, "This is what it's gonna be."
00:08:55.492 – 00:08:58.712
CORBOULD: Yeah, and also we had a car flipping over in front...
00:08:58.87 – 00:09:01.498
...and then a motorbike flipping over in front.
00:09:01.665 – 00:09:05.465
That was all going, and all added to the overall effect of it.
00:09:05.627 – 00:09:08.13
We tested and tested and tested that whole shot.
00:09:08.296 – 00:09:11.596
I mean, I sat in a replica of the explosion at least three or four times...
00:09:11.758 – 00:09:14.932
...just so, you know, I could give a first-hand experience of, you know...
00:09:15.095 – 00:09:16.472
...what it was like.
00:09:16.638 – 00:09:19.858
Though I must admit when we did shoot it, it seemed a lot different...
00:09:20.017 – 00:09:22.27
...having Leo and Ellen in amongst that whole explosion.
00:09:22.436 – 00:09:24.188
They were in their own little safety area...
00:09:24.354 – 00:09:27.483
...where even the paper cup on the table didn't move.
00:09:28.191 – 00:09:31.161
NOLAN: I always knew there'd be a massive computer-graphics component...
00:09:31.319 – 00:09:35.449
...to the sequence, but it was very important to me that we shot...
00:09:35.615 – 00:09:37.367
...as much of it as possible in camera...
00:09:37.534 – 00:09:40.959
...to give the visual-effects guys the chance to do what they do best...
00:09:41.121 – 00:09:44.125
...which is to build on or enhance...
00:09:44.291 – 00:09:47.841
...things that have existed in the real world, things that have been photographed.
00:09:48.003 – 00:09:50.802
They have that for reference and to play with.
00:09:50.964 – 00:09:54.434
What we do in visual effects is we can add more destruction...
00:09:54.593 – 00:09:56.846
...we can add more debris. In particular...
00:09:57.012 – 00:10:00.186
...we can add the kind of stuff which just wasn't possible to do...
00:10:00.348 – 00:10:03.852
...on the day when we actually filmed it, which is all the hard, rigid...
00:10:04.019 – 00:10:07.74
...bits of masonry and glass and furniture and pottery...
00:10:07.898 – 00:10:10.742
...and things like that. So, what you see is a combination of reality...
00:10:10.901 – 00:10:13.074
...and then this extra level that we can bring to it...
00:10:13.236 – 00:10:15.534
...this extra level of danger and destruction.
00:10:15.697 – 00:10:19.702
Chris sort of came up with this notion of being underwater...
00:10:19.868 – 00:10:21.962
...where we're watching visual explosions...
00:10:22.12 – 00:10:24.293
...that have been shot at many different speeds.
00:10:24.498 – 00:10:28.469
NOLAN: There is a lot of precise, mathematical thought and design...
00:10:28.627 – 00:10:30.846
...that went into it from the guys at Double Negative...
00:10:31.004 – 00:10:33.427
...in particular with the idea of the almost fractal nature...
00:10:33.59 – 00:10:36.184
...of the destruction. So when there's an explosion...
00:10:36.384 – 00:10:39.638
...things fragment into smaller pieces. If you look at those small pieces...
00:10:39.805 – 00:10:41.227
...they're, in turn, fragmenting.
00:10:41.389 – 00:10:44.484
And I thought this was a nice way of really tying in...
00:10:44.643 – 00:10:48.773
...with this idea of the potential of the human mind to create...
00:10:48.939 – 00:10:51.237
...infinite levels of complexity within a dream...
00:10:51.399 – 00:10:52.742
...complexity in detail.
00:11:08.416 – 00:11:10.51
If it's just a dream, then why are you--?
00:11:10.71 – 00:11:11.757
["NON, DIE NE REGRETTED RAIN" PLAYING]
00:11:11.92 – 00:11:13.263
COBB: Because it's never just a dream, is it?
00:11:13.421 – 00:11:17.426
And a face full of glass hurts like hell. When you're in it, it feels real.
00:11:17.592 – 00:11:19.435
ARTHUR: That's why the military developed dream sharing.
00:11:19.594 – 00:11:23.019
It was a training program for soldiers to shoot, stab and strangle each other...
00:11:23.181 – 00:11:25.024
...and then wake up.
00:11:25.183 – 00:11:26.81
ARIADNE: How did architects become involved?
00:11:26.977 – 00:11:30.197
COBB: Well, someone had to design the dreams, right?
00:11:30.939 – 00:11:33.317
Why don't you give us another five minutes?
00:11:40.448 – 00:11:42.826
NOLAN: I've always loved the work of M.C. Escher...
00:11:42.992 – 00:11:45.791
...and some of his prints do the most wonderful job...
00:11:45.953 – 00:11:48.581
...expressing paradox and infinity.
00:11:49.623 – 00:11:53.093
I wanted to try and look at the concept of the Pen rose steps...
00:11:53.252 – 00:11:57.257
...this infinite staircase and look at-- How could you build it in the real world?
00:11:57.423 – 00:11:59.425
Is there some real-world equivalent of it?
00:11:59.592 – 00:12:01.686
And what we found through a lot of model building...
00:12:01.844 – 00:12:03.892
...just physically, you know, building them...
00:12:04.054 – 00:12:07.103
...is there are different ways to achieve that illusion.
00:12:07.266 – 00:12:08.483
They're all cheats, obviously.
00:12:08.642 – 00:12:11.737
This isn't something that can exist in the real world, so...
00:12:11.896 – 00:12:13.022
I devised a sequence...
00:12:13.189 – 00:12:16.409
...whereby you would present it from one angle...
00:12:16.567 – 00:12:19.286
...the angle of optical illusion where it works.
00:12:19.445 – 00:12:21.288
DYAS: Chris had already done some research...
00:12:21.447 – 00:12:24.621
...and had decided how he wanted these Penrose steps to be.
00:12:24.783 – 00:12:26.171
His first question to me is:
00:12:26.327 – 00:12:30.503
"Can you build a Penrose step that actually works?"
00:12:30.664 – 00:12:32.416
And I said, "Well, of course, you can."
00:12:32.583 – 00:12:35.712
But actually, ha, ha, it's almost impossible.
00:12:35.878 – 00:12:38.256
We had fitted the set into a location...
00:12:38.422 – 00:12:41.392
...which was sort of a disused games-company facility...
00:12:41.55 – 00:12:44.52
...that was sort of constructed of steel and glass...
00:12:44.678 – 00:12:46.942
...you know, a typical modern, beautiful building.
00:12:47.097 – 00:12:49.191
And we had designed the staircase...
00:12:49.558 – 00:12:52.528
...in the same wood as the stairs that they had at this facility.
00:12:52.686 – 00:12:55.155
So it almost looked like it was part of the environment.
00:12:55.314 – 00:12:58.739
The steps must be built in a way that when you view them...
00:12:58.901 – 00:13:03.532
...the topmost level of the staircase lines with the bottommost level of the staircase.
00:13:03.697 – 00:13:05.54
And so what Visual Effects was able to do...
00:13:05.699 – 00:13:08.122
...is we were able to make computer models of all of this...
00:13:08.285 – 00:13:13.212
...and work out exactly the dimensions of the steps that have to be built...
00:13:13.374 – 00:13:15.877
...and where the camera has to be in three-dimensional space...
00:13:16.043 – 00:13:17.59
...to be able to film it.
00:13:17.753 – 00:13:20.051
It had to be done mathematically perfect.
00:13:20.214 – 00:13:24.219
And in that, it had to be a particular lens at a particular height and distance...
00:13:24.385 – 00:13:25.807
...and the camera had to drop...
00:13:25.97 – 00:13:29.44
...in a particular way to hide the trickery.
00:13:29.598 – 00:13:33.899
The visual effects-- Only requirement on them was to remove the rig...
00:13:34.061 – 00:13:36.189
...which supported the staircase...
00:13:36.355 – 00:13:40.701
...because the structure would've been probably a little dangerous...
00:13:40.859 – 00:13:42.406
...had they not had a rig on it.
00:13:42.57 – 00:13:47.417
It's visually quite dramatic and very carefully thought-out.
00:13:53.08 – 00:13:54.832
See?
00:13:58.586 – 00:13:59.758
Paradox.
00:13:59.92 – 00:14:01.263
So a closed loop like that...
00:14:01.422 – 00:14:04.266
...will help you disguise the boundaries of the dream you create.
00:14:04.425 – 00:14:06.723
But how big do these levels have to be?
00:14:06.885 – 00:14:10.025
It could be anything from the floor of a building to an entire city.
00:14:10.18 – 00:14:13.354
They have to be complicated enough that we can hide from the projections.
00:14:13.517 – 00:14:14.939
- A maze? - Right, a maze.
00:14:15.102 – 00:14:16.399
And the better the maze...
00:14:16.562 – 00:14:19.315
Then the longer we have before the projections catch us?
00:14:19.481 – 00:14:21.279
Exactly.
00:14:21.442 – 00:14:25.788
- My subconscious seems polite enough. - Ha, ha. You wait, they'll turn ugly.
00:14:36.039 – 00:14:40.215
NOLAN: At some point in rewriting the script and in talking about it with Leo...
00:14:40.377 – 00:14:43.881
...I realized the image of the freight train was gonna be an important one.
00:14:44.047 – 00:14:47.347
And whilst you don't want the dreams to become anarchic...
00:14:47.509 – 00:14:49.136
...you don't want them to be chaotic.
00:14:49.303 – 00:14:52.398
You do wanna introduce the danger of Cobb's subconscious...
00:14:52.556 – 00:14:55.275
...the danger that he can be bringing...
00:14:55.434 – 00:14:59.655
...strange elements into these dreams at the worst time imaginable.
00:14:59.813 – 00:15:02.566
It was very much the sort of grand-scale physical effect...
00:15:02.733 – 00:15:07.113
...that I think can make an action film go to that next level.
00:15:07.279 – 00:15:08.906
PFISTER: When I first saw in the script...
00:15:09.072 – 00:15:11.666
...that there's a train driving through a downtown street...
00:15:11.825 – 00:15:13.577
...I thought this is gonna be phenomenal.
00:15:13.744 – 00:15:17.794
I knew right away that it was gonna be 90 or a hundred percent in camera.
00:15:17.956 – 00:15:20.129
STRUTHERS: It's gonna be a little tough downtown L.A...
00:15:20.292 – 00:15:22.34
...t find a train track. So I just said to myself:
00:15:22.502 – 00:15:26.257
"What would I do to get a physical mechanical sequence?"
00:15:26.423 – 00:15:28.721
And the answer is, literally, prefab...
00:15:28.884 – 00:15:33.606
...a train on the outside of a huge semi and drive it down the street.
00:15:33.764 – 00:15:35.766
Well, originally, we were gonna look at a bus.
00:15:35.932 – 00:15:39.072
But there is no place to weld to a bus and we needed a bigger carriage.
00:15:39.227 – 00:15:43.573
So I started doing some investigation on semi tractors, what we ended up using.
00:15:43.94 – 00:15:46.659
We bought a Sterling tractor and then we stretched the frame...
00:15:46.818 – 00:15:51.119
...and all the drivetrain to 36 feet from the front axle to the back axle.
00:15:51.281 – 00:15:54.33
DYAS: The sides of the truck are actually made of plywood...
00:15:54.493 – 00:15:56.12
...very simple, light material.
00:15:56.286 – 00:16:00.837
The lower part of this train was all manufactured from fiberglass...
00:16:00.999 – 00:16:05.63
...molds taken from real train wheels and real train parts.
00:16:05.796 – 00:16:08.8
Everything had the correct texture and look.
00:16:09.132 – 00:16:13.512
The front half of this structure was built in sort of a mild steel.
00:16:13.679 – 00:16:17.9
I think we had about a ton and a half of steel...
00:16:18.058 – 00:16:20.937
...actually in front of the truck's cab...
00:16:21.103 – 00:16:22.195
...in order to make sure...
00:16:22.354 – 00:16:25.483
...that when this train impacted certain things...
00:16:25.649 – 00:16:27.993
...in the film, it hits a number of cars...
00:16:28.151 – 00:16:31.075
...it didn't just shatter. It pushed the cars, smashed them up...
00:16:31.238 – 00:16:34.242
...did what it needed to do, and is very nightmarish.
00:16:34.658 – 00:16:38.788
NOLAN: I felt the challenge of the scene was to try and get across the incongruity...
00:16:38.954 – 00:16:43.38
...the strangeness of the images, so it didn't feel like a regular train crossing.
00:16:43.542 – 00:16:44.964
One of the ways we did is we--
00:16:45.127 – 00:16:48.757
At the last minute, we ordered a lot more cars for it to smash through.
00:16:48.922 – 00:16:51.266
You know, we had been doing one or two, we realized...
00:16:51.425 – 00:16:54.599
...we really needed to smash a whole row of these cars.
00:16:54.761 – 00:16:55.808
And we realized...
00:16:55.971 – 00:16:59.396
...that if we could chew the pavement up with the wheels...
00:16:59.558 – 00:17:01.526
...you would notice not only are there no rails...
00:17:01.685 – 00:17:05.064
...but that actually, these wheels shouldn't be running down this asphalt.
00:17:05.23 – 00:17:08.029
So we put it to Paul and the D-neg guys at the last minute:
00:17:08.191 – 00:17:11.07
"Can you add in these sort of cracks in the pavement...
00:17:11.236 – 00:17:14.08
...this kind of asphalt being churned up by the wheels?"
00:17:14.239 – 00:17:16.662
It was a last-minute addition, they did an incredible job...
00:17:16.825 – 00:17:18.827
...just putting this little bit of damage.
00:17:18.994 – 00:17:21.463
It's a subtle thing, but it really helps you realize...
00:17:21.621 – 00:17:23.043
...the train should not be there.
00:17:26.793 – 00:17:29.592
There's $500 in there. The wallet's worth more than that.
00:17:29.755 – 00:17:31.473
You might at least drop me at my stop.
00:17:31.631 – 00:17:32.632
I'm afraid that it doesn't--
00:17:32.799 – 00:17:34.346
[GUNFIRE THEN EAMES GRUNTS]
00:17:36.219 – 00:17:38.221
[TIRES SCREECHING]
00:17:42.35 – 00:17:44.023
- Cover him! EAMES: Down! Down now!
00:17:44.186 – 00:17:45.312
What the hell is going on?
00:17:49.733 – 00:17:51.952
ARIADNE: This wasn't in the design.
00:17:52.694 – 00:17:54.617
Cobb?
00:17:54.863 – 00:17:56.706
Cobb?
00:18:01.745 – 00:18:03.588
[GUNFIRE]
00:18:45.746 – 00:18:48.716
NOLAN: In all of the outdoor, downtown sequences...
00:18:49.5 – 00:18:51.844
...we had to shoot in Los Angeles during the summer...
00:18:52.003 – 00:18:54.552
...which we always knew was gonna be a challenge.
00:18:55.673 – 00:18:59.303
Chris insisted on shooting this scene in rain in daylight...
00:18:59.468 – 00:19:02.813
...which is not a very common thing to do, really.
00:19:02.972 – 00:19:07.819
Typically in movies, it's at night. It looks the best with a back light...
00:19:07.977 – 00:19:10.947
...and it shows the rain. You know, you watch a football game and they say:
00:19:11.105 – 00:19:13.324
"Look how much it's raining," and you don't see anything.
00:19:13.482 – 00:19:15.951
And that's kind of the daytime rain problem.
00:19:16.11 – 00:19:20.661
Making rain is one of the most difficult things you can do...
00:19:20.823 – 00:19:22.791
...in a picture.
00:19:22.95 – 00:19:25.123
You know, we're doing large chase sequences.
00:19:25.328 – 00:19:26.796
This isn't two people walking.
00:19:26.954 – 00:19:31.175
NOLAN: Chris Corbould and his guys, they mounted rain towers...
00:19:31.334 – 00:19:33.712
...on a scale that I hadn't seen before.
00:19:33.878 – 00:19:37.007
They were able to make it rain for two or three city blocks at a time...
00:19:37.173 – 00:19:41.599
...and really created a very, very convincing downpour with real depth.
00:19:41.802 – 00:19:46.228
The filming in L.A. posed a particular challenge for me in terms of lighting.
00:19:46.39 – 00:19:48.813
To try to make it look like it was an overcast day...
00:19:48.976 – 00:19:50.444
...when it's sunny out.
00:19:54.857 – 00:19:56.575
Chris knew I was sweating this out.
00:19:56.734 – 00:19:59.203
And after I stopped praying for it to be overcast...
00:19:59.362 – 00:20:01.456
...for, you know, months and months and months...
00:20:01.614 – 00:20:03.833
...I finally gave up on that and started doing my homework...
00:20:03.991 – 00:20:06.46
...to try to figure out exactly where the sun was gonna be...
00:20:06.619 – 00:20:09.714
...at what time of day, and do my best to shoot around it.
00:20:10.957 – 00:20:15.087
And I had wonderful help from a fantastic key grip, Ray Garcia...
00:20:15.252 – 00:20:19.428
...who plotted the course of the sun and who managed to block the sun out...
00:20:19.59 – 00:20:23.094
...with a number of different devices, with Condors and cherry pickers...
00:20:23.26 – 00:20:25.854
...and getting on roofs and putting up flags.
00:20:26.013 – 00:20:30.735
And that contributes to the look of the film in a way that's hard to describe.
00:20:30.893 – 00:20:33.396
Certain times we had to embrace the sun a little bit...
00:20:33.562 – 00:20:37.112
...and our joke was, "Okay, well, it's a dream, anyway."
00:20:38.818 – 00:20:42.413
It doesn't rain a lot in L.A. As soon as you do get rain...
00:20:42.571 – 00:20:46.166
...the streets are super slippery because of the amount of oil...
00:20:46.325 – 00:20:47.838
...and exhaust fumes on the streets.
00:20:49.245 – 00:20:51.213
So it's very slippery, it's very dangerous.
00:20:51.372 – 00:20:53.841
None of their cars slid out of control on it.
00:20:54 – 00:20:56.628
We didn't break anything that we didn't wanna break...
00:20:56.794 – 00:20:57.966
...so it went very well.
00:20:59.38 – 00:21:03.101
NOLAN: It's important to me that we go to the limit of what is possible to shoot.
00:21:03.259 – 00:21:06.854
And so, shooting in a massive city environment and creating rain...
00:21:07.013 – 00:21:09.607
...we've really tried to put ourselves through it...
00:21:09.765 – 00:21:12.484
...t emerge through that with an experience for the audience...
00:21:12.643 – 00:21:16.022
...that feels real and tactile to them so they care about it.
00:21:26.115 – 00:21:28.288
COBB: Get Fischer in the back room now.
00:21:28.451 – 00:21:31.375
- Get him in the back room. Move. ARTHUR: What the hell happened?
00:21:31.579 – 00:21:33.001
COBB: Has he been shot? Is he dying?
00:21:33.164 – 00:21:35.041
ARTHUR: I don't know. - Jesus Christ.
00:21:35.207 – 00:21:37.676
ARTHUR: What happened to you? - Blocked by a freight train.
00:21:37.835 – 00:21:39.758
Why put a train in a downtown intersection?
00:21:39.92 – 00:21:41.308
- I didn't. ARTHUR: Where'd it come from?
00:21:41.464 – 00:21:43.683
Why the hell were we ambushed?
00:21:43.841 – 00:21:46.936
Those were not normal projections. They'd been trained, for God's sakes.
00:21:58.356 – 00:22:00.074
DYAS: The tilting bar.
00:22:00.233 – 00:22:02.531
There was all sorts of talk about how we would do this...
00:22:02.694 – 00:22:05.368
...and the usual sort of green screen...
00:22:05.53 – 00:22:08.83
...smoke screen was thrown up. "Let's just do this in post."
00:22:08.991 – 00:22:11.585
And we all knew that we couldn't.
00:22:15.206 – 00:22:19.677
It just had to be done properly in order for it to be a believable thing.
00:22:23.089 – 00:22:25.808
CORBOULD: We built a complete hotel bar and lobby...
00:22:25.967 – 00:22:28.811
...which tilted to 20, 25 degrees.
00:22:31.222 – 00:22:34.567
But it wasn't to get the traditional effect where you expect...
00:22:34.726 – 00:22:38.026
...everything to go slide from one side to the other.
00:22:38.563 – 00:22:41.533
Chris didn't want anything to move, all he wanted was to see...
00:22:41.691 – 00:22:43.113
...these weird things happening.
00:22:45.57 – 00:22:50.667
So, like, the liquid in the glass would all of a sudden tilt to a strange angle.
00:22:51.284 – 00:22:56.04
Light fixings hanging from the ceiling would all of a sudden tilt to a strange angle.
00:23:00.918 – 00:23:02.795
DYAS: It was basically a seesaw...
00:23:02.962 – 00:23:06.683
...that just seesawed back and forth on this central point.
00:23:06.841 – 00:23:09.685
But if you've ever tried standing on that, it's very hard.
00:23:10.219 – 00:23:11.937
MAN: And shooting.
00:23:12.096 – 00:23:14.269
ROOTER: We had auditions for extras...
00:23:14.432 – 00:23:18.687
...and about a third of the people were physically unable to do it.
00:23:18.853 – 00:23:20.776
Which is why we had the auditions.
00:23:20.938 – 00:23:23.327
What I didn't wanna do is bring everybody in on the day...
00:23:23.483 – 00:23:25.03
...which is often the way it's done...
00:23:25.193 – 00:23:29.323
...and say, "Welcome to the 45-degree floor. Don't worry, you'll be fine"...
00:23:30.156 – 00:23:32.454
...then watch them turn green on camera.
00:23:33.618 – 00:23:36.337
PFISTER: And of course, the image on the screen is very subtle.
00:23:36.537 – 00:23:40.087
It's far less dramatic than what we were going through on the set...
00:23:40.249 – 00:23:42.547
...trying to hold it all together while the set was tilting.
00:23:42.71 – 00:23:45.634
MAN: The set is tilting now, okay? Hold down the cameras.
00:23:45.797 – 00:23:48.516
PFISTER: We had to ratchet the camera down and bolt the camera down.
00:23:48.674 – 00:23:50.551
I had to physically hold on myself...
00:23:50.718 – 00:23:54.848
...as the set tipped, and try to keep everything from sliding away.
00:24:03.189 – 00:24:06.784
COBB: You feel that? You've actually been trained for this, Mr. Fischer.
00:24:06.943 – 00:24:10.948
Pay attention to the strangeness of the weather, the shift in gravity.
00:24:11.113 – 00:24:14.287
None of this is real. You're in a dream.
00:24:19.08 – 00:24:21.333
Now, the easiest way for you to test yourself...
00:24:21.499 – 00:24:25.595
...is to try and remember how you arrived at this hotel. Can you do that?
00:24:26.42 – 00:24:27.683
Yeah, l...
00:24:27.839 – 00:24:30.388
COBB: No, breathe, breathe. Remember your training.
00:24:40.35 – 00:24:43.069
CORBOULD: The horizontal rotating corridor was an early concept...
00:24:43.228 – 00:24:45.356
...that was in the script which started off...
00:24:45.522 – 00:24:49.026
...as like a 40-foot corridor, and then stretched to a 60-foot corridor.
00:24:49.193 – 00:24:52.618
Then Chris Nolan felt he needed a 100-foot corridor.
00:24:52.78 – 00:24:56.626
DYAS: After we'd determined the methodology for rotating the sets...
00:24:56.784 – 00:25:00.63
...which was basically suspending the set in these huge rings...
00:25:00.788 – 00:25:04.167
...Chris Corbould had one of his engineers work with us initially...
00:25:04.333 – 00:25:09.385
...on what size the rings needed to be and how they were going to function...
00:25:09.546 – 00:25:12.516
...because there was an enormous amount of structural steel...
00:25:12.674 – 00:25:14.642
...that needed to be welded and formed...
00:25:14.802 – 00:25:17.43
...months ahead of when the set needed to be built.
00:25:17.596 – 00:25:21.271
CORBOULD: There was a series of eight 30-foot diameter rings...
00:25:21.433 – 00:25:25.233
...which were all joined together, and each one of those rings was rotated...
00:25:25.395 – 00:25:29.32
...using an electric motor, via camshafts and drive wheels.
00:25:29.483 – 00:25:31.986
The whole thing had to be built to closed tolerances...
00:25:32.152 – 00:25:34.996
...because if it was out or if the rings weren't totally round...
00:25:35.155 – 00:25:37.408
...you know, it would've given us all sorts of problems.
00:25:37.574 – 00:25:40.248
It would've created vibrations and bumps.
00:25:40.41 – 00:25:45.086
The main thing about it was the accuracy in actually fabricating the rig.
00:25:45.249 – 00:25:47.968
NOLAN: I mean, the idea of using a centrifuge to...
00:25:48.127 – 00:25:51.131
...manipulate gravity, it's been done on various films...
00:25:51.296 – 00:25:53.173
...most notably, Kubrick 2001.
00:25:53.34 – 00:25:58.392
And I like the idea of re purposing that technology, and really...
00:25:58.554 – 00:26:02.229
...trying to choreograph into a fight sequence and camera movement...
00:26:02.391 – 00:26:05.144
...and all the rest. Really do something that could be completely...
00:26:05.31 – 00:26:08.405
...in camera in a way that, you know, I hadn't seen before.
00:26:08.564 – 00:26:11.738
With any of the sets that required this movement...
00:26:11.9 – 00:26:14.824
...all the equipment had to be locked into the set.
00:26:14.987 – 00:26:17.41
It either had to rotate with it if it made sense...
00:26:17.573 – 00:26:21.703
...or the set would rotate out of the light...
00:26:21.869 – 00:26:24.167
...so it did require a lot of planning...
00:26:24.329 – 00:26:28.3
...on my part in order to determine what was gonna happen...
00:26:28.458 – 00:26:33.009
...with the lights when the set moved and what was gonna happen with the camera.
00:26:33.172 – 00:26:37.348
Is the camera separate from the set or is it actually rotating with the set?
00:26:37.509 – 00:26:41.309
GORDON-LEVITT: If you lock the camera on the ground...
00:26:41.471 – 00:26:43.473
...the audience doesn't see the room spinning.
00:26:43.64 – 00:26:46.985
The audience just sees us moving all over the place.
00:26:47.144 – 00:26:50.318
It looks like we're jumping on the ceiling and stuff.
00:26:50.48 – 00:26:53.404
In order to actually get it done, I couldn't think of it that way.
00:26:53.567 – 00:26:56.116
I had to think of it as, "This is the ground.
00:26:56.278 – 00:26:59.202
Okay, now this is the ground. Okay, now this is the ground."
00:27:06.872 – 00:27:10.126
- Bring on the double. - No!
00:27:10.292 – 00:27:14.013
Joseph Gordon-Levitt had, I think, only two weeks' rehearsal.
00:27:14.171 – 00:27:16.299
And he honestly was fantastic...
00:27:16.465 – 00:27:20.971
...and he attacked it with such excitement and enthusiasm...
00:27:21.136 – 00:27:23.73
...and he was determined to do it all himself...
00:27:23.889 – 00:27:25.687
...and it really, really pays off.
00:27:25.849 – 00:27:28.602
You have to have the right mindset and physicality.
00:27:28.769 – 00:27:31.113
If you start looking outside, you get motion sickness...
00:27:31.271 – 00:27:33.774
...you do physically get disoriented.
00:27:33.941 – 00:27:36.069
So it's keeping inside of this environment.
00:27:36.235 – 00:27:39.739
And, I mean, the director tried it, I tried it. It was not easy...
00:27:39.905 – 00:27:41.407
...and he far exceeded what we did.
00:27:41.573 – 00:27:45.544
GORDON-LEVITT: So many action movies now, it's all done on computers later...
00:27:45.702 – 00:27:48.33
...whereas these scene that we did...
00:27:48.497 – 00:27:51.797
...it was so well thought out. Just the thing is revolving...
00:27:51.959 – 00:27:55.964
...and it's up to me to keep my balance. And we did the performance...
00:27:56.129 – 00:27:58.177
...and they shot it and that's that.
00:27:58.34 – 00:28:03.471
I love that. There's no substitute for real human energy in performance.
00:28:03.637 – 00:28:06.982
That was the most fun. It was the most challenging and the most fun.
00:28:07.14 – 00:28:10.44
I remember when I saw the footage from that scene.
00:28:10.602 – 00:28:15.153
It really is stunning. And we did elect to play it in one shot...
00:28:15.315 – 00:28:17.943
...simply because our immediate response...
00:28:18.11 – 00:28:21.114
...when you first see the footage is it just doesn't look possible.
00:28:21.28 – 00:28:23.533
It's very clever.
00:28:24.616 – 00:28:27.586
GORDON-LEVITT: Once we fall into the hotel room...
00:28:27.744 – 00:28:30.543
...the game is very different than when we were in the corridor.
00:28:30.706 – 00:28:32.549
It was easier but it was more dangerous...
00:28:32.708 – 00:28:36.383
...because if you mess up and get behind the rotation...
00:28:36.545 – 00:28:38.798
...you can fall and really hurt yourself.
00:28:38.964 – 00:28:42.343
Whereas, in the corridor, you're only falling eight feet or something...
00:28:42.509 – 00:28:44.807
...and have pads, so it didn't feel great...
00:28:44.97 – 00:28:47.644
...but it's not a big deal. When you fall 20 or 30 feet...
00:28:47.806 – 00:28:51.856
...that's bad. So we had to take more care to not make any mistakes...
00:28:52.019 – 00:28:53.862
...in the hotel room.
00:28:54.021 – 00:28:57.446
CORBOULD: We designed it to rotate at six revs per minute.
00:28:57.607 – 00:29:00.952
We got the stunt people in there because it had one long side...
00:29:01.111 – 00:29:04.206
...and one short side. It quickly became apparent...
00:29:04.364 – 00:29:08.119
...they couldn't get across the long side, as it were, at six rpm.
00:29:08.285 – 00:29:10.583
They were really struggling. So we had to gear it down.
00:29:10.746 – 00:29:13.09
In actual fact, when we do that shot...
00:29:13.248 – 00:29:15.967
...we speed up and slow down the revolution...
00:29:16.126 – 00:29:19.096
...wherever they're on the rig. If they're going along the long side...
00:29:19.254 – 00:29:21.757
...we slow it down. Then when they go across the short side...
00:29:21.923 – 00:29:23.266
...we speed it up.
00:29:23.425 – 00:29:27.475
So that was interesting. There was a whole testing process.
00:29:38.065 – 00:29:40.614
[GRUNTING]
00:29:58.835 – 00:29:59.882
[GUNSHOT]
00:30:01.296 – 00:30:02.639
[GUNFIRE]
00:30:09.888 – 00:30:12.562
DYAS: Fortress Mountain was certainly the biggest set.
00:30:12.724 – 00:30:14.818
But more importantly than the set...
00:30:14.976 – 00:30:19.072
...is the setting, for Chris. He wanted to be able to look out a window...
00:30:19.23 – 00:30:22.985
...and see these absolutely beautiful backdrops of mountains...
00:30:23.151 – 00:30:26.246
...that could not be achieved digitally.
00:30:26.404 – 00:30:30.454
I was shooting a commercial the year before we began Inception.
00:30:30.617 – 00:30:34.042
And I was up in Calgary filming, and while I was up there...
00:30:34.203 – 00:30:35.75
...Chris said, "Hey, keep an eye out.
00:30:35.914 – 00:30:38.212
We're looking for a place to shoot this snow sequence."
00:30:38.374 – 00:30:40.638
I said, "Look, there's a closed-down ski resort here...
00:30:40.793 – 00:30:42.636
...and you gotta check it out."
00:30:42.795 – 00:30:46.766
NOLAN: We gambled with our location. We were told we might get early snow...
00:30:46.925 – 00:30:49.849
...because we were shooting relatively early in the year. November.
00:30:50.011 – 00:30:52.48
We had to take an early gamble, because with the set...
00:30:52.639 – 00:30:57.941
...as big as the one that Guy envisaged for this, he had to start building in August.
00:30:58.102 – 00:31:00.855
THOMAS: About a week before we went to Canada, there was no snow.
00:31:01.022 – 00:31:05.323
The whole thing was built around snow. And so we were very, very tensed.
00:31:05.485 – 00:31:09.035
NOLAN: In the end, it dumped massively. Right before we got up there...
00:31:09.197 – 00:31:11.95
...we had more snow than we've had for 30 years in that time of year...
00:31:12.116 – 00:31:15.495
...which was essential for the amount of action we had to stage there.
00:31:15.662 – 00:31:17.63
With the action in this level of the dream...
00:31:17.789 – 00:31:21.214
...we wanted it to be expansive, cinematic action.
00:31:21.376 – 00:31:24.801
And, for me, the place I immediately go to is the Bond films.
00:31:24.963 – 00:31:28.388
The idea of a ski chase in an exotic location.
00:31:28.549 – 00:31:32.474
An extraordinary, sort of, bad guy's lair, some big complex in the mountains.
00:31:32.637 – 00:31:37.768
That kind of thing. I grew up watching these films with extraordinary stunt work in them.
00:31:37.934 – 00:31:39.982
In recent years, I felt like I was seeing films...
00:31:40.144 – 00:31:42.488
...where they didn't bother to do those things anymore...
00:31:42.647 – 00:31:45.4
...where they immediately go into some kind of visual-effects solution...
00:31:45.566 – 00:31:48.035
...whereas all the stunt guys I knew who I'd worked with...
00:31:48.194 – 00:31:51.949
...were chomping at the bit to do these things they know how to do.
00:31:52.115 – 00:31:54.368
And so Tom Struthers, the stunt coordinator on the film...
00:31:54.534 – 00:31:56.912
...he really took it on board as a challenge...
00:31:57.078 – 00:31:59.331
...working hand in hand with Chris Corbould...
00:31:59.497 – 00:32:02.751
...the special effects coordinator, making it work on set.
00:32:02.917 – 00:32:04.919
They really took me at my word in terms of:
00:32:05.086 – 00:32:07.384
"Okay, how can we film these things in-camera?"
00:32:07.547 – 00:32:10.642
GOLDBERG: We tried to do as many things in-camera as possible...
00:32:10.8 – 00:32:12.473
...which is very difficult when you're in Calgary...
00:32:12.635 – 00:32:16.731
...where it's gonna be freezing cold. There's gonna be extreme temperatures...
00:32:16.889 – 00:32:18.766
...and extreme weather. One of the big components...
00:32:18.933 – 00:32:21.311
...in this particular sequence was the avalanche.
00:32:21.477 – 00:32:23.696
I would suspect it's very hard to do an avalanche.
00:32:23.855 – 00:32:25.778
We went out and did several of them...
00:32:25.94 – 00:32:29.194
...which required a series of professional avalanche-makers...
00:32:29.36 – 00:32:31.362
...to fly around, dropping timed explosions...
00:32:31.529 – 00:32:34.578
...on top of mountains and setting them off.
00:32:35.825 – 00:32:37.623
ROOTER: It's unique working in snow.
00:32:37.785 – 00:32:39.537
I mean, this was a week. It was fantastic.
00:32:39.704 – 00:32:41.923
It looked like the roof of the world.
00:32:42.081 – 00:32:45.551
I'd look up from my immediate task, and I'm looking down...
00:32:45.71 – 00:32:49.84
...a mountain range. It was like a shot...
00:32:50.006 – 00:32:52.225
...out of National Geographic, from the Himalayas.
00:32:52.383 – 00:32:55.853
It was an extraordinary thing to be doing.
00:33:17.075 – 00:33:18.372
Did Sames add any features?
00:33:18.534 – 00:33:20.002
I don't think I should tell you.
00:33:20.161 – 00:33:22.459
We don't have time for this. Did he add anything?
00:33:22.955 – 00:33:24.172
He added an air-duct system...
00:33:24.332 – 00:33:27.006
-...that can cut through the maze. - Good. Explain it to them.
00:33:37.72 – 00:33:40.519
NOLAN: What I wanted to do for the zero-gravity sequences...
00:33:40.681 – 00:33:42.775
...was to take an ordinary environment...
00:33:42.933 – 00:33:46.107
...and achieve this very incongruous zero-gravity effect.
00:33:46.27 – 00:33:48.489
We did it through a number of different rigs...
00:33:48.647 – 00:33:53.744
...and in the final edit what you see is, shot to shot to shot...
00:33:53.903 – 00:33:58.374
...it tends to be a different orientation, a completely different rig in each shot.
00:33:58.532 – 00:34:01.081
And I think that, more than anything else...
00:34:01.243 – 00:34:03.746
...really stops the audience in seeing the trick...
00:34:03.913 – 00:34:06.462
...of how these things are done.
00:34:06.624 – 00:34:09.844
The vertical corridor is the same as the horizontal.
00:34:10.002 – 00:34:11.049
It's an identical set.
00:34:11.212 – 00:34:13.089
The difference, it has been built vertically...
00:34:13.255 – 00:34:14.768
...so it's standing on its end.
00:34:14.924 – 00:34:18.144
And this means we can drop actors, stunt performers on wires...
00:34:18.302 – 00:34:20.805
...down into the set, and the camera looks up at them.
00:34:20.971 – 00:34:23.065
And they can then be raised or lowered...
00:34:23.224 – 00:34:25.067
...they can swing around inside the set...
00:34:25.226 – 00:34:27.354
...and it looks like they're floating in zero gravity.
00:34:27.52 – 00:34:31.741
In real zero-g, and I've spoken to people that have been in real zero-g...
00:34:31.899 – 00:34:36.746
...and what they told me is, they never felt so relaxed in their life.
00:34:36.904 – 00:34:40.499
What I did is the exact opposite of that.
00:34:40.658 – 00:34:42.877
In order to make it look like that was the case...
00:34:43.035 – 00:34:46.79
...I actually had to keep every muscle tight...
00:34:46.956 – 00:34:48.924
...because I was supporting myself.
00:34:49.083 – 00:34:53.589
I didn't had to worry about making myself look as if I was having a hard time.
00:34:53.754 – 00:34:55.301
I was having a hard time. Ha, ha.
00:35:03.43 – 00:35:06.98
WOMAN [ON RECORDING]: If you'd like to make a call, please hang up and try again.
00:35:07.142 – 00:35:08.61
If you need help, hang up...
00:35:08.769 – 00:35:12.239
How do I drop you without gravity?
00:35:14.608 – 00:35:17.407
Arthur has a couple minutes, and we have about 20.
00:35:48.351 – 00:35:53.027
NOLAN: The look of limbo was a complicated design issue.
00:35:53.397 – 00:35:58.745
Myself and Guy Dias spent a long time talking about it, about what it might be.
00:36:01.572 – 00:36:05.202
DYAS: As depicted in the script, Cobb and Male...
00:36:05.368 – 00:36:09.043
...were architects who were using this dream landscape...
00:36:09.205 – 00:36:13.005
...as sort of practice ground, as their playground.
00:36:13.167 – 00:36:16.046
It needed to appeal to architects, you know...
00:36:16.212 – 00:36:18.465
...and people who would know about this stuff.
00:36:22.176 – 00:36:24.099
We determined that we would have...
00:36:24.261 – 00:36:26.73
...buildings maybe from the '20s and '30s...
00:36:26.889 – 00:36:29.768
...buildings that were, you know, very strongly inspired...
00:36:29.934 – 00:36:33.609
...by Cor busier and all the great architects from Bauhaus.
00:36:33.771 – 00:36:36.445
And those buildings would slowly transition...
00:36:36.607 – 00:36:39.201
...into buildings from the '50s to the '60s...
00:36:39.36 – 00:36:41.408
...to the '70s, the '80s, and so on and so forth.
00:36:41.57 – 00:36:43.413
And then beyond where we are now...
00:36:43.572 – 00:36:47.247
...into the new generation of green self-sufficient buildings...
00:36:47.41 – 00:36:51.165
...and so, suddenly you ended up with this world of limbo...
00:36:51.33 – 00:36:53.298
...with buildings that were laid out in grids...
00:36:53.457 – 00:36:55.846
...that just got taller and taller and taller and taller.
00:36:58.212 – 00:37:01.011
FRANKLIN: Limbo city was a really interesting challenge...
00:37:01.173 – 00:37:05.849
...because this is where I think we were really pushed the hardest creatively.
00:37:07.763 – 00:37:11.393
In the script it's described that they emerge out of the sea...
00:37:11.559 – 00:37:13.687
...and they are confronted with what appears to be...
00:37:13.853 – 00:37:17.824
...a giant crumbling cliff face, but then it's made of buildings.
00:37:18.607 – 00:37:20.609
This was something we spent quite a lot of time...
00:37:20.776 – 00:37:23.95
...working on concepts for and designing and developing ideas...
00:37:24.113 – 00:37:26.457
...and looks and feels for how this thing might work.
00:37:28.117 – 00:37:29.994
NOLAN: The ultimate thing we settled on...
00:37:30.161 – 00:37:33.665
...was the idea of a sort of an architectural glacier, really.
00:37:33.831 – 00:37:36.63
All these architectural forms that are collapsing into the sea.
00:37:38.419 – 00:37:42.299
To achieve it, we knew there would be a massive visual-effects burden.
00:37:42.465 – 00:37:44.718
We had Paul Franklin and his guys at Double Negative...
00:37:44.884 – 00:37:47.433
...come on and study footage of glaciers caving...
00:37:47.595 – 00:37:49.472
...dropping into the sea.
00:37:49.638 – 00:37:53.142
And look at ways we could replace those with architectural forms.
00:37:54.643 – 00:37:55.94
We were going to Morocco anyway.
00:37:56.103 – 00:37:58.777
First scouting, they're driving from the airport and passed...
00:37:58.939 – 00:38:01.567
...some very strange enormous architectural forms...
00:38:01.734 – 00:38:04.533
...these housing estates, these buildings in the middle of nowhere...
00:38:04.695 – 00:38:06.743
...which we thought might give us a great basis...
00:38:06.906 – 00:38:10.581
...and give Paul a great basis to build out his architectural creations.
00:38:13.078 – 00:38:15.217
And so we shot the actors down in Morocco.
00:38:15.372 – 00:38:18.467
We shot them walking through this extraordinary set of buildings...
00:38:18.626 – 00:38:21.379
...which the visual-effects guys then built out.
00:38:24.006 – 00:38:26.68
Then we had the special-effects guys, Chris Corbould and his team...
00:38:26.842 – 00:38:30.267
...actually bring water into the foot of these buildings...
00:38:30.429 – 00:38:31.772
...and create waves and so forth.
00:38:33.474 – 00:38:36.148
So that the line between visual effects and practical photography...
00:38:36.31 – 00:38:38.358
...was as blurred as we could make it.
00:38:40.814 – 00:38:45.911
The idea, really, there is that Cobb and Male have created...
00:38:46.07 – 00:38:48.789
...this enormous amount of architecture...
00:38:48.948 – 00:38:52.168
...over the very long time they're trapped in this state.
00:38:52.326 – 00:38:55.205
And the water, for me, the ocean represents the subconscious.
00:38:55.371 – 00:38:57.465
It represents the subconscious over time...
00:38:57.623 – 00:38:59.921
...eating away at this vision of theirs, and it being...
00:39:00.084 – 00:39:02.257
...gradually lost, gradually eroding.
00:39:44.543 – 00:39:47.888
NOLAN: With Chris Corbould, once we'd built this enormous set...
00:39:48.047 – 00:39:49.924
...he was determined that we should blow it up.
00:39:50.091 – 00:39:54.471
Even though we had a miniature shoot scheduled to do that particular effect.
00:39:54.637 – 00:39:56.685
But I thought it might be interesting.
00:39:56.847 – 00:39:59.475
It's always great to get something full-size, if you can.
00:39:59.642 – 00:40:03.237
CORBOULD: It's a proper structure, about-- To be honest, it just lends itself...
00:40:03.395 – 00:40:06.365
...so perfectly to blowing up. The whole thing was built on stilts...
00:40:06.524 – 00:40:10.87
...so, technically, if we blow those stilts away, there's nothing holding it up.
00:40:11.028 – 00:40:14.202
If it had been concrete foundations, that sort of thing...
00:40:14.448 – 00:40:15.791
...it would've been a lot more difficult.
00:40:15.95 – 00:40:19.75
NOLAN: So he packed it full of explosives and the last thing we shot on the film...
00:40:19.912 – 00:40:23.257
...was blowing it up. But unfortunately the charges...
00:40:23.415 – 00:40:26.794
...on the front wall didn't go off, so the tower fell the wrong way.
00:40:26.961 – 00:40:31.637
We still got a very nice couple of usable shots of explosions...
00:40:31.799 – 00:40:34.348
...that are in the film. We then combined that...
00:40:34.51 – 00:40:38.64
...with a very large-scale miniature shoot back in Los Angeles.
00:40:50.693 – 00:40:52.787
FRANKLIN: It's about 45 feet high, the miniature...
00:40:52.945 – 00:40:56.04
...and that was an amazing construction in its own right, existing--
00:40:56.198 – 00:41:01.455
Completely filled the car park at New Deal Studios in Marina led Rey.
00:41:01.62 – 00:41:05.124
New Deal's car park these days is now surrounded by condominiums.
00:41:05.291 – 00:41:08.261
And so all the kids in the condo were sitting out on their balconies, you know...
00:41:08.419 – 00:41:10.467
...waiting for us to blow this thing up.
00:41:23.267 – 00:41:27.647
NOLAN: Ironically, the first time they blew that miniature, the same thing happened.
00:41:27.813 – 00:41:31.238
The tower fell in the wrong direction. So we actually had to redo that.
00:41:31.4 – 00:41:33.152
In the finished film, it's a combination...
00:41:33.319 – 00:41:37.165
...of the full-scale destruction and the miniature.
00:42:23.035 – 00:42:27.211
NOLAN: I've always liked working with composers, with Hans in particular...
00:42:27.373 – 00:42:31.128
...in a way where you wanna free them from the constraints of the picture.
00:42:31.294 – 00:42:35.845
You want them to be inspired by it, but I like Hans to be able to write freely...
00:42:36.007 – 00:42:38.76
...and not be trying to hit cuts, not be trying to squeeze things...
00:42:38.926 – 00:42:43.352
...into the tightest edits that we're gonna wind up with for certain sequences.
00:42:44.015 – 00:42:46.313
I wanna kind of hear where his imagination will go...
00:42:46.475 – 00:42:50.446
...work completely free to just interpret the ideas of the script.
00:42:51.689 – 00:42:55.239
And then, based on that, we take that in the edit suite, and we start...
00:42:55.401 – 00:42:58.575
...finding interesting points of synchronization between picture...
00:42:58.738 – 00:43:00.581
...and the music he's written.
00:43:01.198 – 00:43:04.042
[SUSPENSEFUL MUSIC PLAYING ON SPEAKERS]
00:43:05.453 – 00:43:09.003
NOLAN: Hans is one of the great masters of finding the sound of things.
00:43:10.207 – 00:43:13.507
Not just what the tunes are, not just what the notes are...
00:43:13.669 – 00:43:16.969
...but how they're played, what the voices are of the thing.
00:43:17.131 – 00:43:19.725
ZIMMER: What seemed to work well in this movie...
00:43:19.884 – 00:43:22.728
...is to turn even more towards electronics.
00:43:22.887 – 00:43:25.481
Dark Knight was already pretty heavy on the electronics...
00:43:25.639 – 00:43:30.019
...but this one, somehow, pushing that whole thing a little bit further.
00:43:30.186 – 00:43:34.362
We took things which were created completely electronically...
00:43:34.523 – 00:43:37.242
[SUSPENSEFUL MUSIC PLAYING ON SPEAKERS]
00:43:37.401 – 00:43:40.029
...these ambiances, these atmosphere tracks...
00:43:40.196 – 00:43:42.87
...and put them in front of the orchestra and said:
00:43:43.032 – 00:43:46.912
"Okay, now I want the orchestra to go and imitate...
00:43:47.078 – 00:43:50.378
...synthesize electronic sounds."
00:43:50.706 – 00:43:54.836
[SUSPENSEFUL MUSIC PLAYING ON SPEAKERS]
00:43:57.463 – 00:43:59.557
I booked the craziest, biggest brass section...
00:43:59.715 – 00:44:02.514
...I think, ever assembled in the studio.
00:44:02.676 – 00:44:04.349
[PLAYING SUSPENCEFUL MUSIC]
00:44:04.512 – 00:44:07.766
Six bass trombones, six tenor trombones.
00:44:07.932 – 00:44:09.434
Four tubas in the middle...
00:44:09.6 – 00:44:12.9
...and six French horns above.
00:44:14.939 – 00:44:16.657
The force when they were really blowing.
00:44:16.857 – 00:44:19.201
[PLAYING SUSPENCEFUL MUSIC]
00:44:19.568 – 00:44:23.323
You know, it's a physical force. You know, it hits you.
00:44:23.572 – 00:44:25.324
[PLAYING SUSPENCEFUL MUSIC]
00:44:32.206 – 00:44:34.88
ZIMMER: Early on, I had just started writing and I was thinking, you know...
00:44:35.042 – 00:44:38.546
...I'd love to have one other color in the score and I was thinking, guitars.
00:44:38.712 – 00:44:40.714
Then I was thinking, there's a hideous thing...
00:44:40.881 – 00:44:44.476
...that happens when you have guitars and orchestra.
00:44:44.635 – 00:44:48.765
I was sitting there and playing around with bad sampled guitar sounds...
00:44:48.931 – 00:44:51.354
...and started coming up with this little tune.
00:44:51.517 – 00:44:53.861
And it was like, I knew at that moment...
00:44:54.019 – 00:44:55.817
...who I was writing for.
00:44:55.98 – 00:44:58.028
MARE: Okay, so it goes up again then, right?
00:44:58.19 – 00:45:02.07
NOLAN: He said he was gonna get somebody, "somebody like Johnny Marr"...
00:45:02.236 – 00:45:05.035
...was how he said it, you know, with a smile on his face.
00:45:05.197 – 00:45:08.622
Which meant that was exactly who we were gonna have. Which I was excited about...
00:45:08.784 – 00:45:11.128
...from knowing Johnny Man's music from The Smiths.
00:45:11.287 – 00:45:14.291
MARR: That was quite a good run. - Yeah.
00:45:14.457 – 00:45:17.085
NOLAN: He's a bit of a legend.
00:45:22.673 – 00:45:23.845
[PLAYING MELLOW MUSIC]
00:45:24.008 – 00:45:26.431
NOLAN: Hans is a sort of minimalist composer...
00:45:26.594 – 00:45:29.063
...with a sort of maximality production sense.
00:45:29.221 – 00:45:31.315
[PLAYING MELLOW MUSIC]
00:45:31.474 – 00:45:35.524
So he'll write these incredibly specific and simple pieces.
00:45:35.686 – 00:45:39.441
But the way in which he'll then record them and produce that is on...
00:45:39.607 – 00:45:43.032
...such a colossal scale. And with so much movement and drive...
00:45:43.194 – 00:45:47.7
...that there's a point where, particularly in reels six and seven...
00:45:47.865 – 00:45:50.994
...we just let the music take over everything.
00:45:52.536 – 00:45:54.664
And make them just turn the music Newfoundlander
00:45:54.83 – 00:45:56.832
...because you realize the momentum of the film...
00:45:56.999 – 00:45:59.252
...is entirely defined by the structure of the music...
00:45:59.418 – 00:46:02.388
...as the film sort of snowballs towards the end.
00:46:14.391 – 00:46:15.483
Welcome home, Mr. Cobb.
00:46:16.644 – 00:46:18.738
Thank you, sir.
00:46:46.798 – 00:46:50.803
NOLAN: I think that the department heads on the film were just great collaborators...
00:46:50.968 – 00:46:52.436
...on the rules of the world...
00:46:52.595 – 00:46:55.269
...because they where helping me to define those things.
00:46:55.431 – 00:46:59.231
Their interpretations to the script, along with the actors'.
00:46:59.393 – 00:47:00.815
Everybody is coming at it from:
00:47:00.978 – 00:47:05.449
"Okay, how are they going to execute their end of what needs to take place?"
00:47:05.608 – 00:47:07.906
And in doing that, in examining the rules...
00:47:08.069 – 00:47:10.788
...whether it's, you know, Jeffrey, you know, talking about...
00:47:10.947 – 00:47:13.541
...what the actors are wearing and at what point they change...
00:47:13.699 – 00:47:16.498
...and at what point, you know, the clothes are the same or different.
00:47:16.661 – 00:47:20.916
Whether it's Wally talking about the different photographic looks of the dream...
00:47:21.082 – 00:47:23.335
...or Guy Dias with the design of things...
00:47:23.501 – 00:47:27.256
...really everybody had something to say or something to bring...
00:47:27.421 – 00:47:33.053
...in terms of making the rules of the piece as concrete as possible.
00:47:33.219 – 00:47:36.689
It's a great part of the production process, which is that in reproduction...
00:47:37.39 – 00:47:40.018
...as all of the departments are looking for answers...
00:47:40.184 – 00:47:41.936
...they're looking for concrete answers...
00:47:42.103 – 00:47:45.323
...about what they have to provide for a particular scene:
00:47:45.481 – 00:47:47.654
where that scene comes in the time line...
00:47:47.817 – 00:47:51.117
...in this script, sort of what level of reality we're dealing with.
00:47:51.279 – 00:47:54.032
They become excellent creative collaborators...
00:47:54.198 – 00:47:56.326
...because they're real logic filters.
00:47:56.492 – 00:48:00.247
They have a lot of interesting questions about the rules of the world...
00:48:00.413 – 00:48:01.756
...and how those might be defined.
00:48:01.914 – 00:48:06.135
And so it was an extremely productive part of the process.
00:48:08.754 – 00:48:11.348
We put together an incredible crew, but also an incredible cast...
00:48:11.507 – 00:48:13.43
...to portray the team on screen.
00:48:13.593 – 00:48:16.847
And it was fascinating watching the sort of chemistry between them...
00:48:17.013 – 00:48:21.519
...and see them evolve as a crew very much the way the characters do in the story.
00:48:21.684 – 00:48:26.19
It really brought a richness, a liveliness to their scenes together...
00:48:26.355 – 00:48:30.61
...that on the page, you know, you hope for that kind of chemistry.
00:48:30.776 – 00:48:32.528
But it's not until you get on the floor...
00:48:32.695 – 00:48:36.12
...and you see the actors making it their own.
00:48:36.282 – 00:48:39.377
And in doing that and in working with great people, as we have...
00:48:39.535 – 00:48:41.412
...terrific team on Inception...
00:48:41.579 – 00:48:43.547
...you start to build up a very complicated world.
00:48:43.706 – 00:48:47.301
You start to build a lot of interesting complexity, a lot of interesting density...
00:48:47.46 – 00:48:50.339
...because of all the thought that's come from different people...
00:48:50.504 – 00:48:52.017
...into the finished product.
00:48:52.173 – 00:48:55.393
And certainly for me, when I look at the finished film...
00:48:55.551 – 00:48:57.474
...I see a lot of different things in there...
00:48:57.637 – 00:49:00.857
...that I hadn't known were going to be in there when I was working on the script.
00:49:01.015 – 00:49:05.691
There's just huge input from a very large group of people...
00:49:05.853 – 00:49:07.07
...lending their talents to it.
00:49:07.23 – 00:49:10.7
And I think there is a lot of detail in the film, there's a lot of density to it...
00:49:10.858 – 00:49:13.361
...and I think that if people care to take another look at it...
00:49:13.527 – 00:49:15.37
...if they've been interested in doing that...
00:49:15.529 – 00:49:18.078
...they will find different things, interesting detail...
00:49:18.241 – 00:49:21.12
...that people have put into the film.